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Sunday, March 6, 2016

Oblivion 2 & 1




Oblivion 2.

"Play time is over" - calls mother to small child -
darkness tips ready to fall - she calls waiting for
a fast patter - soft arms flung about her her neck -
excited chatter - "Play time is over.  Come in -
the nearly navy night flicks sparks of last day-
light falling to ground a glint here and there her
voice leeching strength - Defiant, spirit rousing
she exhales, stands tall and calls into the empty 
now navied night -"Play time is over. Come in
now." In the marrow of her bones she knows - 
her child now gone grown - flown on velvet wings 
soaring in-to starlight - her small child joining all 
spun-sugar others sparkling molten light in night
She leans loose limbed against hearth, feet on ground
door unlocked - letting her eyes finally fall to story -
to the ancient amethyst dreams of mothers calling fast
vanished days of small soft children flown, grown gone...
Come
play
home
again...








... and on the previous day a different perspective ..from these whirling words...



Oblivion  1. 

game time over ... call in the small child -

darkness is falling - the ancient story spills-
errant sparks fly from the hearths as mothers
hold the ground in solid strength - there a soft
velvet child and then another spin away - the
Spirit shudders - defiant they soar on wings-
still-wet ... game time over - the mothers call
to each of their small spun sugar children now
soaring grown into their own amethyst dreams -
bon voyage ...



14 comments:

  1. I enjoyed both... getting carried into your piece with empathy and yearning.
    ZQ

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  2. Your first poem is particularly poignant. Speaks to mothers everywhere. Yes, as time goes on we wish for that playtime again, the time when could so easily call our children back. Sad but true, the time has passed...and if they come back it is because they choose to.

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  3. "darkness tips ready to fall" They grow up and leave us as fast as night comes. Lovely work, Pearl.

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  4. Wow this is absolutely incredible - loved both perspectives.
    Beautifully penned.

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  5. There are days for playing nights for sleeping... I imagine when it was that simple.

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  6. Both poems are so poignant, Pearl. It makes me think back to those soft bodies running back home in the twilight....now all grown and gone. These are lovely to read. I especially love the amethyst dreams.

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  7. Both pieces are stunning with so much feeling of longing for the past when her children lives were her own responsibility. The gift of procreation is a two edged sword when you realize what you have created is not yours to own but only to love. My best read this week.

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  8. I remembered my own childhood when my mom called me and my siblings into the house when it was getting dark. this was a fairy-tale of a poem about those days in my mind. thanks for the memories.

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  9. Both strong poems, Pearl, but I like the feeling and rhythm of Oblivion 2, better.

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  10. Oblivion 2 has my heart in its hands.....oy....especially, "to the ancient amethyst dreams of mothers calling fast
    vanished days of small soft children flown, grown gone"---wowzers!!

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  11. Touching! And each so beautiful, I can't choose.

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  12. There is a progression and almost a refinement of thought in each of these oblivions..i like the trail of thought and runs in rhyme in the first piece especially - almost becoming the child in order to convey the loss..the second distilled perhaps - both are moving and combined give a very lasting image and story

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  13. I really like your first poem (or #2 as it's numbered). It reminds me so much of my own children, now grown.

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  14. yes, two perspectives, but there is so much more aching and yearning in the first poem (oblivion 2).
    to me this is a poem about the child growing up and moving on with his/her life. i think every parent can relate to this heartfelt poem. :)

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